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Crime Scene House

In a sleepy stone house on a quiet, rural street just South of campus, DeSales criminal justice students are about to walk into a murder scene. Or a terrorist threat. Or a national disaster.

In meticulously detailed simulations, students put their classroom knowledge to the ultimate test as they collect evidence, conduct criminal investigations, and interview suspects — all while learning to utilize the tools used by today’s law enforcement professionals. 

Students have the chance to execute search warrants, collect forensic evidence (like fingerprints), and practice crime scene photography. 

The crime scene house is used for Criminal Justice, Homeland Security, Political Science and Law & Society majors to simulate emergencies, national disasters, crime scenes, and courtrooms. 

It features multiple rooms to create a variety of different scenarios. And, there’s a state of the art classroom, too — so professors can teach directly on site. 

Take a look inside ...
“We’re very excited to have a mock crime scene house here at DeSales University. It gives our students hands-on, practical experience in investigating criminal activity.” - Joe Walsh, Instructor of Computer Science and Criminal Justice and Director of the Master of Arts Criminal Justice (MACJ) Program

In a sleepy stone house on a quiet, rural street just South of campus, DeSales criminal justice students are about to walk into a murder scene. Or a terrorist threat. Or a national disaster ...

In meticulously detailed simulations, students put their classroom knowledge to the ultimate test as they collect evidence, conduct criminal investigations, and interview suspects — all while learning to utilize the tools used by today’s law enforcement professionals.

Students have the chance to execute search warrants, collect forensic evidence (like fingerprints), and practice crime scene photography.

In addition to Criminal Justice, the crime scene house is used for Homeland Security, Political Science and Law & Society to simulate emergencies, national disasters, crime scenes, and courtrooms. It features multiple rooms to create a variety of different scenarios. And, there’s a state of the art classroom, too — so professors can teach directly on site.

“We’re very excited to have a mock crime scene house here at DeSales University,” says Joe Walsh, Instructor of Computer Science and Criminal Justice and Director of the Master of Arts Criminal Justice (MACJ) Program. “It gives our students hands-on, practical experience in investigating criminal activity.”


Clips of students investigating simulated crimes and responding to simulated disasters in a special house dedicated to this purpose at DeSales University. 

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