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Policies

Please see the Undergraduate Catalog for the most complete information about all academic policies and procedures.

University Policies and Procedures

  • Academic Probation

    Academic probation is an official warning that a student is no longer in acceptable academic standing because, either:

    • the student's grade point average has fallen below the level for the student's class (see Acceptable Academic Standing for minimum GPA information), or
    • the GPA for a particular semester is below 1.000 .

    While on academic probation, a student loses his/her eligibility for financial aid. A student may appeal to the Financial Aid Committee for one semester of financial aid. See the Undergraduate Catalog for conditions and process of appeal.

  • ACCESS Courses Taken by Traditional Day Students

    If courses are not offered in the day session, limited seats may be available for traditional day students in hybrid ACCESS courses under unusual circumstances. The student must request an exception by the deadline date for changing or adding courses as indicated on the traditional day students’ academic calendar for each semester. 

  • Alcohol & Drug Policy

    PHILOSOPHICAL STATEMENT

    DeSales University has a deep concern for its students, faculty and staff and seeks to promote their well being in all areas through its policies. The University expresses concern about illegal drug and alcohol use, not only because it is a violation of state and federal laws, but because it is a serious detriment to the mission and goals of the University.

    STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

    The unlawful possession, use, distribution, dispensation, manufacture, or sale of alcohol, narcotics or illicit drugs, other than those medically prescribed, properly used and in the original container, is prohibited at DeSales University. All members of the University community shall be held responsible for their behavior and for respecting the rights of others.

    DeSales University does not encourage the use of alcoholic beverages and is concerned about alcohol abuse. It recognizes, however, that individuals of legal age must be given the individual freedom to choose to drink. The University expects that individuals will make responsible decisions about the use of alcoholic beverages.

    Responsibility for obeying laws and University regulations concerning alcohol and drugs rests directly with each individual. Any student, faculty or staff member found in violation of federal, state and/or local law, or who violates the University's alcohol and drug policies, is subject to University disciplinary procedures, as well as criminal arrest and prosecution. Possible disciplinary sanctions include, but are not limited to, residential suspension, expulsion, participation in an alcohol or drug rehabilitation program, and dismissal. Sanctions may also apply to registered student organizations and to off-campus conduct involving activities sponsored or authorized by the University.

    LEGAL STATUTES AND PENALTIES

    I. ALCOHOL- The use, possession, or distribution of beverages containing alcohol on University property, including residence halls, is governed by the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and by the University's alcohol policy. Alcoholic beverages are prohibited outside all University residences and in all public areas of University residences, including but not limited to hallways, stairwells, laundry rooms, lounges, public restrooms, as well as outside of all University residences, including outdoor areas/patios at the University Heights. The University alcohol policy is strictly enforced in all residence halls.

    The following University rules apply on property owned or controlled by the University or as part of any University activity:

    • The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age is prohibited. Additionally, it is further prohibited for any student or employee to be in the presence of a person illegally possessing or consuming alcoholic beverages.
    • Providing alcohol to or hosting alcohol gatherings with individuals under 21 years of age is prohibited
    • Intoxication and the consumption of alcoholic beverages by students or employees so as to adversely affect academic or job performance and/or endanger the physical well-being of other persons and/or oneself, or which leads to damage of property is prohibited.
    • It is prohibited to possess or dispense beer in a keg, beer ball, or anything else leading to excessive consumption. Bars, keg refrigerators, beer pong tables, and other physical items used for storing, serving, or consuming large quantities of alcohol are also prohibited.
    • Students under 21 years of age are not permitted to possess empty containers of alcohol (cans or bottles) or alcohol-related paraphernalia as these items are considered acceptable evidence of illegal alcohol consumption.
    • A resident who is 21 years or older may not have more than one case of beer (30 12 oz. servings), one gallon of wine, or one 750 ml. liquor bottle in his/her possession or room.
    • Homemade alcoholic beverages are prohibited.
    • Drinking games involving alcoholic beverages are prohibited.
    • The possession and use of any alcoholic energy drinks (for example, Four Loko, Joose, Sparks) on campus is prohibited regardless of whether or not the student who possesses or consumes is of legal age.

    The following represents a summary of relevant statutes from the Pennsylvania Crimes Code (Title 18) and the Pennsylvania Liquor Code (Title 47) for alcohol related offenses:

    1. A person, under the age of 21, commits a summary offense if he/she attempts to purchase, purchases, consumes, possesses or knowingly and intentionally transports any liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Maximum fine $300 plus court costs and mandatory loss of your drivers license for 90 days for a first offense, one year for a second offense and two years subsequent offenses. Police officers making an arrest for this offense are obligated to notify the parents or guardians of the minor charged (Pa C.S.A. 6308).

    2. A person is guilty of a summary offense for a first violation and a misdemeanor of the third degree for any subsequent violations if he/she is under the age of 21 and knowingly and falsely represents him/herself to be 21 years of age or older, for the purpose of obtaining any liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Maximum fine is $500 plus court costs and loss of driver's license(Pa C.S.A. 6307).

    3. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree if he/she knowingly, willfully, and falsely represents to any licensed dealer, or other person, that a minor is of legal age for the purpose of inducing a person to sell or furnish any liquor, malt or brewed beverages. The minimum penalty is a fine of not less than $300 (Pa C.S.A. 6309).

    4. A person commits a misdemeanor of the third degree if he/she intentionally and knowingly sells or intentionally and knowingly furnishes, or purchases with the intent to sell or furnish, any liquor or malt or brewed beverages to a person who is less than 21 years or age. Minimum penalty for violating this subsection is a fine not less than $1000 for the first violation and a fine of $2500 for each subsequent violation plus court costs (Pa C.S.A. 6310.1A).

    5. A person commits a misdemeanor of the second degree if he/she intentionally, knowingly or recklessly manufactures, makes, alters, sells or attempts to sell an identification card falsely representing the identity, birth date or age of another. Minimum penalty is a fine of not less than $1000 for the first violation and a fine of not less than $2500 for each subsequent violation (Pa C.S.A. 6310.2).

    6. A person commits a summary offense for a first violation and a misdemeanor of the third degree for any subsequent violation if he/she, is under 21 years of age and possesses an identification card that falsely identifies the person as being 21. It is also a violation to use the identification card of another individual. Minimum penalty is a fine not more than $500 plus court costs (Pa C.S.A. 6310.3).

    7. It is unlawful for any person who is an operator or any occupant in a motor vehicle to be in possession of an open alcoholic beverage container or to consume any alcoholic beverages or controlled substances. This is a summary offense with a maximum penalty of $300 (Pa C.S.A. 7513).

    8. A person is guilty of a summary offense if he/she appears in any public place under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance. Penalty is a maximum fine of $300 plus court costs (Pa C.S.A. 5505).

    9. A minor (under 21 years of age) shall not drive, operate or be in physical control of a motor vehicle while having alcohol in his/her system. This is a summary offense with a fine of $100 (Pa C.S.A. 3718).

    10. A person shall not drive, operate or be in physical control of the movement of a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance to a degree that renders the person incapable of safe driving. For an individual who is 21 years of age or older, the Blood Alcohol Content is .08, for a minor under 21, the Blood Alcohol Content is .02. It is a misdemeanor of the second degree for a first offense.

    II. DRUGS - DeSales University prohibits illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia on property owned or controlled by the University or as part of any University activity. Drug paraphernalia is defined as any legitimate equipment, product, or material that is modified for making, using, or concealing illegal drugs and includes, but is not limited to, bongs, roach clips, drug pipes and any items modified or adapted so that they can be used to consume drugs. Drug paraphernalia found on University property will be confiscated.

    Federal Law- Federal drug laws prohibit the manufacture, distribution, dispensation and possession of controlled substances unless specifically permitted by statute. The government categorizes controlled substances according to Schedules I through V. Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse, with no accepted medical use. Schedule I drugs include, but are not limited to, heroin, marijuana, hashish, LSD and other hallucinogens. Schedule II drugs have a high potential for abuse, but some medical use, and include opium, morphine, codeine, barbiturates, cocaine and its derivatives, amphetamines, phencyclidine (PCP) and other narcotics. Schedule III, Schedule IV and Schedule V drugs have some potential for abuse, but less than Schedule I and II drugs, with Schedule III drugs having the most potential for abuse and Schedule V the least. Schedule III, IV and V drugs include chloral hydrate (IV), certain barbiturates (III and IV), benzodiazines (IV), glutethimide (III), other depressants and narcotics (III and IV), amphetamines (III) and other stimulants (III and IV). A complete listing of controlled substances and their classifications is contained in Title 21 of the United States Code at Section 812.

    Penalties for the unauthorized possession, manufacture, sale, distribution or delivery of drugs varies according to the type and quality of drug, the existence of prior offenses and whether death or serious injury results from the drug involved. Special federal penalties apply to the sale or distribution of controlled substances to persons under age 21 or within 1,000 feet of school, college or university property.

    Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Law- State law prohibits, among other things, the unauthorized manufacture, sale, delivery and possession of controlled substances. Consistent with federal law, Pennsylvania classifies controlled substances according to Schedules I through V. Penalties vary according to the type of controlled substance involved. For a simple possession of a small amount of marijuana (misdemeanor), persons may be subject to 30 days imprisonment and a $500 fine. A person may be subject to a maximum of 15 years imprisonment and a $25,000 fine for the manufacture, delivery or possession of a Schedule I or II controlled drug such as cocaine, PCP or LSD (felony). Sentences can be doubled for second and subsequent offenses. Sentences can also be doubled for distribution of controlled offenses to persons under the age of eighteen. Penalties range from a mandatory minimum sentence of seven years and a $50,000 fine for subsequent convictions for the manufacture, delivery or possession of 100 grams or more of a Schedule I or II controlled narcotic drug.

    FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES (as of June 2007)

    DRUG/SCHEDULE

    QUANTITY

    PENALTIES

    QUANTITY

    PENALTIES

    Cocaine

    (Schedule II)

    500 - 4999 gms mixture

    First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual

    Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

    5 kgs or more mixture

    First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

    Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if not an individual.

    2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment

    Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

    5-49 gms mixture

    50 gms or more mixture

    Fentanyl

    (Schedule II)

    40 - 399 gms mixture

    400 gms or more mixture

    Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)

    10 - 99 gms mixture

    100 gms or more mixture

    Heroin

    (Schedule I)

    100 - 999 gms mixture

    1 kg or more mixture

    LSD

    (Schedule I)

    1 - 9 gms mixture

    10 gms or more mixture

    Methamphetamine (Schedule II)

    5 - 49 gms pure or 50 - 499 gms mixture

    50 gms or more pure or 500 gms or more mixture

    PCP (Schedule II)

    10 - 99 gms pure or 100 - 999 gms mixture

    100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

    PENALTIES

    Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

    Any amount

     

    First Offense: Not more that 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

    Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

    Flunitrazepam
    (Schedule IV)

    1 gm or more

    Other Schedule III drugs

    Any amount

     

    First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

    Second Offense: Not more 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual

    Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

    30 to 999 mgs

    All other Schedule IV drugs

    Any amount

    First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 6 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual.

    Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

    Less than 30 mgs

    All Schedule V drugs

    Any amount

    First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 2 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

    FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES- MARIJUANA (as of June 2007)

    DRUG

    QUANTITY

    1st OFFENSE

    2nd OFFENSE

    Marijuana

    1,000 kg or more mixture; or 1,000 or more plants

    • Not less than 10 years, not more than life
    • If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life
    • Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual
    • Not less than 20 years, not more than life
    • If death or serious injury, mandatory life
    • Fine not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if other than an individual

    Marijuana

    100 kg to 999 kg mixture; or 100 to 999 plants

    • Not less than 5 years, not more than 40 years
    • If death or serous injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life
    • Fine not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual
    • Not less than 10 years, not more than life
    • If death or serious injury, mandatory life
    • Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual

    Marijuana

    more than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg mixture

    more than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 plants

    • Not more than 20 years
    • If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life
    • Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual
    • Not more than 30 years
    • If death or serious injury, mandatory life
    • Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than individual

    Marijuana

    1 to 49 plants; less than 50 kg mixture

    • Not more than 5 years
    • Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million other than individual

     

    • Not more than 10 years
    • Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual

     

    Hashish

    10 kg or less

    Hashish Oil

    1 kg or less

    CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT **

    Schedule of Controlled Substance Categories and Examples

    Penalty For Felony Delivery and Obtaining Possession thru Forgery or Fraud

    Penalty For Misdemeanor Possession

    SCHEDULE I: Drugs with no accepted medical use in the U.S. and a high potential for abuse.

    Heroin, LSD, Mescaline, PCP, Cocaine, Methamphetamine

     

    Marijuana & Hashish:
    1,000 kg. or more

    50 kg. to 999 kg.

     

     

    Under 50 kg.

     

    Jail: 5 years to life

    Fine: Up to $4,000,000

     

    Jail: 10 years to life

    Fine: Up to $4,000,000

    Jail: 5 to 40 years

    Fine: Up to $2,000,000

     

    Jail: Up to 5 years

    Fine: Up to $25,000

    Jail: 1 year
    Fine: $5,000.00

    SCHEDULE II: Drugs with a high potential for abuse; with severe psychic or physical dependence possible, but also having an accepted medical use.

    Morphine, Methadone, Amphetamine, Barbiturate

    Jail: Up to 20 years
    Fine: Up to $1,000,000

    Jail: Up to 1 year
    Fine: Up to $100,00

    SCHEDULE III: Drugs with less abuse potential than Schedule II; and an accepted medical use.

    Codeine of Compounds, Tincture of Opium, Phendimetrazine

    Jail: Up to 5 years
    Fine: Up to $250,000

    Jail: Up to1 year
    Fine: Up to $100,000

    SCHEDULE IV: Drugs with a lower potential for abuse and an accepted medical use.

    Valium, Ativan

    Jail: Up to 3 years
    Fine: $Up to $250,000

    Jail: Up to 1 year
    Fine: Up to $100,000

    SCHEDULE V: Drugs with a low potential for abuse and an accepted medical use.

    Parapectolin

    Misdemeanor
    Jail: Up to 1 year
    Fine: Up to $100,000

    Jail: Up to 1 year
    Fine: Up to $100,000

     

     

     

     

    ** The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Prevention and Control Act of 1970.

     

    Federal law also allows for the possibility of loss of property and federal grants as defined by the Controlled Substances Act and regulation 21CFR 1300.11-1300.15.

    HEALTH RISKS

    I. ALCOHOL-

    Short-term effects- Alcohol is a depressant of the central nervous system which suppresses the part of your brain that controls judgment, resulting in a loss of inhibitions. It affects physical coordination, causing blurred vision, slurred speech and loss of balance. Alcohol is involved in a large proportion of fatal road accidents, assaults and incidents of domestic violence.

    Long-term effects- Excessive drinking over time is associated with the following health problems and conditions:

    • Liver diseases
    • Neurological problems (dementia, stroke and neuropathy)
    • Cardiovascular problems (myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation and hypertension)
    • Psychiatric problems (depression, suicidality and anxiety)
    • Social problems (unemployment, lost productivity and family problems)
    • Gastrointestinal problems (pancreatitis and gastritis)

    Binge Drinking- Most adverse health effects from underage drinking stem from acute intoxication resulting from binge drinking. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, immediate health effects of binge drinking may include:

    • Alcohol poisoning, a medical emergency that results from high blood alcohol levels of alcohol that suppress the central nervous system and cause loss of consciousness, low blood pressure and body temperature, coma, respiratory depression and death.
    • Risky sexual behaviors, including unprotected sex, sex with multiple partners, and increased risk of sexual assault. These behaviors can result in unintended pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases.
    • Violence, including intimate partner violence and child maltreatment.

    II. DRUGS-

    Substance Category & Name

    (Examples of Commercial & Street Names)

    Intoxication Effects &

    Potential Health Consequences

    Cannabinoids

    Hashish (Boom, chronic, gangster, hash, hash oil, hemp)

    Marijuana (Blunt, dope, ganja, grass, herb, joints, Mary Jane, pot, reefer, sinsemilla, weed)

    Euphoria, slowed thinking and reaction time, confusion, impaired balance/coordination, cough and coordination/cough, frequent respiratory infections; impaired memory and learning; increased heart rate, anxiety; panic attacks; tolerance, addiction

    Depressants

    Barbiturates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; barbs, reds, phennies)

    Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Valium, Xanax; candy, downers, sleeping pills, tranks)

    Flunitrazepam*** (Rohypnol, forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, Roche, roofies, roofinol, rope)

    GHB*** (Gamma-hydroxybutyrate; G, Georgia home boy, liquid ecstasy)

    Methaqualone (Quaalude, Sopor, Parest; ludes, mandrex, quad, quay)

    *** Associated with sexual assaults.

    Reduced anxiety; feeling of well-being; lowered inhibitions; slowed pulse and breathing; lowered blood pressure; poor concentration/fatigue; confusion; impaired coordination, memory, judgment; addiction; respiratory depression and arrest; death

    For barbiturates—sedation, drowsiness/depression, unusual excitement, fever, irritability, poor judgment, slurred speech, dizziness, life-threatening withdrawal

    For benzodiazepines—sedation, drowsiness/dizziness

    For flunitrazepam—visual and gastrointestinal disturbances, urinary retention, memory loss for the time under the drug's effects

    For GHB—drowsiness, nausea/vomiting, headache, loss of consciousness, loss of reflexes, seizures, coma, death

    For methaqualone—euphoria/depression, poor reflexes, slurred speech, coma

    Dissociative Anesthetics

    Ketamine (Ketalar SV; cat valiums, K, Special K, vitamin K)

    PCP and analogs (Phencyclidine; angel dust)

    Increased heart rate and blood pressure, impaired motor function/memory loss; numbness; nausea/vomiting

    For ketamine—at high doses, delirium, depression, respiratory depression and arrest

    For PCP and analogs—possible decrease in blood pressure and heart rate, panic, aggression, violence/loss of appetite, depression

    Opioids & Morphine Derivatives

    Codeine (Empirin with codeine, Fiorinal with codeine, Robitussin A-C, Tylenol with Codeine; Captain Cody, Cody, schoolboy; doors & fours, loads, pancakes and syrup)

    Pain relief, euphoria, drowsiness /nausea, constipation, confusion, sedation, respiratory depression and arrest, tolerance, addiction, unconsciousness, coma, death

    For codeine—
    less analgesia, sedation, and respiratory depression than morphine

    Opioids & Morphine Derivatives

    Fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Sublimaze; Apache, China girl, China white, dance fever, friend, goodfella, TNT, Tango and Cash)

    Heroin (Diacetylmorphine; brown sugar, dope, H, horse, junk, skag, skunk, smack)

    Morphine (Roxanol, Duramorph ; M, Miss Emma, monkey, white stuff)

    Opium (Laudanum, paregoric , big O, black stuff, block, gum, hop)

    Oxycodone HCL (Oxycontin; Oxy, O.C., killer)

    Hydrocodone bitartrate, acetaminophen

    (Vicodin; vike, Watson-387)

    Pain relief, euphoria, drowsiness /nausea, constipation, confusion, sedation, respiratory depression and arrest, tolerance, addiction, unconsciousness, coma, death

    For heroin—
    staggering gait

    Stimulants

     

    Amphetamine (Biphetamine, Dexedrine; bennies, black beauties, crosses, hearts, LA turnaround, speed, truck drivers, uppers)

    Cocaine (Cocaine hydrochloride; blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coke, crack, flake, rock, snow, toot)

    Methamphetamine (Desoxyn ; chalk, crank, crystal, fire, glass, ice, meth, speed, peace, STP, X, XTC)

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin; JIF, MPH, R-ball, Skippy, the smart drug, vitamin R); safe and effective for treatment of ADHD.

    Nicotine (Cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, snuff, spit tobacco, chew)

    Increased heart rate, blood pressure, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration, energy, increased mental alertness /rapid or irregular heart beat; reduced appetite, weight loss, heart failure, nervousness, insomnia

    For amphetamine—rapid breathing/tremor, loss of coordination; irritability, anxiousness, restlessness, delirium, panic, paranoia, impulsive behavior, aggressiveness, tolerance, addiction, psychosis

    For cocaine—increased temperature /chest pain, respiratory failure, nausea, abdominal pain, strokes, seizures, headaches, malnutrition, panic attacks

    For methamphetamine—aggression, violence, psychotic behavior/memory loss, cardiac and neurological damage; impaired memory and learning, tolerance, addiction

    For nicotine—additional effects attributable to tobacco exposure, adverse pregnancy outcomes, chronic lung disease, cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, tolerance, addiction

    Other Compounds

     

    Anabolic steroids (Anadrol, Oxandrin, Durabolin, Depo-Testosterone, Equipoise; roids, juice)

    Inhalants (Solvents such as paint thinners, gasoline, & glues; gases such as butane, propane, aerosol propellants, & nitrous oxide; nitrites such as isoamyl, isobutyl, & cyclohexyl; laughing gas, poppers, snappers, whippets)

     

    For anabolic steroidshypertension, blood clotting and cholesterol changes, liver cysts and cancer, kidney cancer, hostility and aggression, acne; in adolescents, premature stoppage of growth; in males, prostate cancer, reduced sperm production, shrunken testicles, breast enlargement; in females, menstrual irregularities, development of beard and other masculine characteristics

    For inhalants—stimulation, loss of inhibition; headache; nausea or vomiting; slurred speech, loss of motor coordination; wheezing, unconsciousness, cramps, weight loss, muscle weakness, depression, memory impairment, damage to cardiovascular and nervous systems, sudden death

     

    PREVENTION AND ASSISTANCE

    Alcohol and drug abuse affect individuals in a variety of ways which can significantly interfere with the mission of this University. Substance abuse can lead to dependency and addiction, with serious consequences for personal health and the overall quality of life. Counseling services and educational programs are available through the Counseling Center, the Campus Ministry Office and the Health Center. Confidential assistance will be offered to those who seek drug related counseling. Individuals, however, are always legally responsible for their own actions

    The Counseling Center offers counseling and psychological services, including individual and group therapy. The Counseling Center also offers referrals to community drug and alcohol treatment programs, including Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Al-Anon, and Adult Children of Alcoholics Network of the Lehigh Valley.

    Various drug and alcohol prevention programs are offered or presented at the University, including the following:

    • Alcohol Edu (online alcohol education program that all incoming students are required to complete prior to coming to campus)
    • Alcohol Task Force (comprised of faculty, staff, and students)
    • Peer Counseling and Alcohol Awareness Campaign (provided by PACE)
    • Alcohol screenings (available in person and online)
    • Character U Presentations (national speakers on Drugs and Alcohol)
    • Freshman Orientation Programs
    • Resident Advisor Training, Residence Hall Programming and the Wellness Living/Learning Community (sponsored by the Office of Residence Life)
    • DSU Community Wellness Fair (sponsored by Counseling and Health Center)
    • Current literature and resources available in the Counseling and Health Centers
    • Healthy CHOICES Events (sponsored by the Athletic Department) 

    On-Campus Resources

    If calling from off-campus or a cellular telephone, please dial 610-282-1100 and then the following extension:

     

    Telephone Extension

    Counseling Center

    1776 or 1462

    Health Center

    1776 or 1232

    Campus Ministry

    1898 or 1313

     

     

     

    Community Resources

     

    Telephone

    Alcoholics Anonymous

    610-882-0558

       

    Caron Foundation

    1-800-678-2332

    Crime Victims Council Hotline

    610-437-6611

    Treatment Trends, Inc 610-439-0218
     

     

    Lehigh Valley Hospital (Cedar Crest)

    610-402-8000

    Narcotics Anonymous Hotline

    610-439-1998

    Sacred Heart Hospital

    610-776-4500 (Allentown)

    St. Luke's Hospital

     

    610-770-8300 (Allentown)
    610-954-4000 (Bethlehem)               610-419-7800 (Quakertown)

     

     

  • Auditing

    What does it mean to audit a course?

    To audit means to attend lectures and, with the permission of the instructor, to participate in class discussions. Auditors do not take exams and do not earn credits for the class they are auditing.

    How do I audit a course?

    To audit a course, complete the appropriate section of the Approval Form. This form must be signed by the instructor and your advisor before being submitted to the Registrar.

    May I switch from credit to audit or audit to credit once I have begun the class?

    Yes, you may switch from one to the other, within one month of the first day of class, with the permission of the instructor and your academic advisor. Check the Academic Calendar for specific dates. (N.B. Consult the ACCESS calendar, if you are taking an ACCESS course.)

  • Changing Majors

    If you wish to change your major or if you are undeclared and wish to declare a major, discuss this decision with your academic advisor and complete the following steps:

    • Print a copy of the Approval Form in MyDSU under "Forms & Documents". Provide the information requested at the top of the form. Then, move to item 8 and insert your current major, as well as your intended new major.
    • Obtain the signature of your current academic advisor.
    • Return the form to the Registrar's Office and request that the Approval Form and a copy of your transcript be sent to the chairperson of department in which the major resides. The chairperson will accept, reject, or defer your request.
    • Within one week, meet with the chairperson to learn the chairperson's decision. If you are accepted into the major, the chairperson will forward the decision (the Approval Form) to the Registrar's Office, who will change your major. This change will be recorded on your permanent record. Shortly after this, the the director of the academic resource center or another representative of the Academic Resource Center will e-mail you the contact information of your new advisor.

    If you wish to add a second major to your program of study, please click here. If you wish to add a minor to your program of study, please click here.

  • Class Recording Policy

    The DeSales University Class Recording Policy aims to establish parameters for audio and/or visual recordings in order to protect the rights of students and faculty and their intellectual property and to ensure compliance with federal law concerning approved accommodations for students with documented disabilities. The recording of classes and the dissemination of those recordings will be limited as articulated in this policy.  This policy is designed to: 

    • protect student and faculty dignity and privacy;
    • respect the integrity and effectiveness of the classroom experience; and
    • comply with copyright and other pertinent laws.

    Approved Accommodation: Institutions of higher education are not required to provide the requested or the student's preferred accommodation. Rather, they are required to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations.  All DeSales University students must provide appropriate documentation for the diagnosis of disabilities prior to receiving accommodations based on that disability. Reasonable accommodations will be determined and approved by Disability Services Office on an individual basis.  A diagnosis in and of itself does not automatically qualify an individual for accommodations. 

    Class: A class is defined as a regularly scheduled time(s) when students meet with a course instructor or guest presenter for instruction, learning, and/or assessment. For example, traditional day classes on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays ordinarily meet for 60 minutes, while traditional day classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays ordinarily meet for 90 minutes. This does not include private consultations about a course, such as those that might take place outside class instruction or after class has been dismissed. 

    Course Materials: Lecture notes, outlines, slides, Powerpoint presentations, readings, or other content made available to students by the instructor or guest presenter via Blackboard, in-class handouts, or other means. 

    Documented Disability:  The ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requires that accommodations be developed on a case-by-case basis, in a deliberative process between the institution and the person with disabilities. Recent and appropriate documentation of the disability and related functional limitations for which they are requesting accommodations must be provided to the Disability Services Office. Accommodations will be authorized by the Disability Services Office based on appropriate documentation of need. In some instances, the Director will need to consult with other members of the University community in order to determine the most appropriate accommodation.  

    Recording: A video or audio replication or photographic image recorded on devices including, but not limited to, audio recorders, video recorders, phones, digital cameras, media players, computers, Smart Pens, and other handheld devices that record images and/or sound. 

    Initiation of Class Recordings 
    The purpose of recording class is to facilitate the achievement of learning outcomes and/or educational access, as a teaching/learning tool.  Class recordings may be initiated by a course instructor or, in the case of an approved accommodation, by the Director of Disability Services in keeping with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other pertinent laws. Students are prohibited from initiating recordings unless advance written permission is obtained from the class instructor. An instructor may give permission to an entire class as part of the course syllabus or, alternatively, grant permission to select individuals. The instructor may rescind previously granted permission to record at any point during the course, provided that doing so does not compromise an approved accommodation. No instructor will be required to permit recording except under requirements of law. 

    Access to Class Recordings 
    Access to class recordings created by the University is restricted to the students in the recorded class who have been given permission by the instructor or for whom recording has been approved as a reasonable accommodation by the Director of Disability Services. The content of any class, including course materials created by the instructor, is the intellectual property of that instructor. As such, any permitted class recordings made by students must be destroyed one week after the final grade is posted for the course, unless the student has received permission from the instructor to retain them or is entitled to retain them as an approved accommodation. Likewise, the instructor may inspect, retrieve, or destroy a recording created by the University, provided that any destruction is done after the recording has been used for its intended purpose and doing so does not compromise an approved accommodation.  Instructors may retain a recording for other purposes on the condition that all identifying student audio and images are edited out of the recording.  

    Classes recorded by the Distance Education and Instructional Technology Department (DEIT) will be controlled via Blackboard, our secure course management platform, and other password protected systems. Access will be restricted to students as stated above, the instructor, and those DEIT personnel necessary to maintain the system. Students will only have access to these recordings for the duration of the course. 

    Dissemination of Class Recordings 
    Class recordings may not be reproduced, transferred, distributed, or displayed in any manner. Students may not share authorized recordings from class in any way with anyone.  This includes, but is not limited to: 

    • sharing recordings with other students;
    • sharing recordings with parents or guardians;
    • sharing recordings with friends;
    • sharing recordings through social media;
    • posting recordings online;
    • e-mailing recordings to anyone; and
    • retaining downloaded recordings.

    Permission to allow class recording is not a transfer of any copyrights in the recording or related course materials. Materials contained within the class recordings, including but not limited to videos and other web-based media, may also have their own copyright protection for which there may be separate prohibitions under the law against dissemination. 

    Consequences of Policy Violations 
    Distribution of class recordings or other course materials may constitute copyright infringement in violation of federal or state law, or University policy. Violation of this policy may subject a student to disciplinary action, including but not limited to failing the class under the University’s Academic Honesty Policy, in addition to any legal consequences that may apply. 

    Faculty must comply with current federal law regarding approved accommodations for students with documented disabilities. 

    APPROVED May 16, 2017 by vote of the faculty. 

  • Completing Minors

    What is a minor?

    A minor is an emphasis in an area of study, in addition to the General Core Requirements and the required courses for the major. The six courses required to complete each of the various minors are listed in the Undergraduate Catalog. A minor can often complement a major and enhance your resume. For more about how you can use a minor to enhance your resume, contact the Director of Career Services and Internships.

    How can I declare a minor?

    • Consult the Undergraduate Catalog to determine which courses are required for the minor you wish to declare.
    • Consult with your advisor in planning your minor courses.
    • Complete the six required courses, as outlined in the Undergraduate Catalog.
    • Fill out the Completion of Minor Form.
    • Obtain the required signatures and return the form to the Registrar's Office.
    • Your minor will be indicated on your transcript.

    May I have more than one minor?

    Yes, you may, depending upon the requirements of your major and the number 
    of additional courses you are able to fit into you schedule or to take during summer 
    school.

  • Credit Hour Policy

    Credit Hour Policy

    Background 

    The U.S. Department of Education (34 CFR Section 600.2) defines “credit hour” as: “…an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

    (1) one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or, 

    (2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.”

    The Pennsylvania Department of Education (22 Pa. Code Section 31.21) states that a “semester hour represents a unit of curricular material that normally can be taught in a minimum of 14 hours of classroom instruction, plus appropriate outside preparation or the equivalent as determined by the faculty.”

    DeSales University Credit Hour Policy
    DeSales University complies with the above standards for the assignment of credit hours as established by the U.S. Department of Education and by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. In addition, DeSales University is in compliance with policies set forth by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, using acceptable and consistent methods for assigning credit hours to all courses and programs of study and conforming to commonly accepted practice in higher education.

    The number of credits is included with each course description in the Undergraduate Catalog and Graduate Catalog. Information about the number of credits, meeting dates and times, classroom location, and mode of delivery is published online and made available to students prior to registration.

    Unit of Measurement
    All DeSales University undergraduate and graduate courses are assigned credits as a unit of measurement for curricular material regardless of time frame or mode of delivery. A credit is the equivalent of one hour (50 minutes) of face-to-face classroom instruction per week for a semester of approximately 15 weeks. There is an expectation of two hours of outside study by the student for each hour of classroom instruction.           

    Outside Study Activities
    Outside study activities may include readings, review of notes, written assignments or journals, group projects, preparation for quizzes or exams, vocal or instrumental practice, rehearsal for dramatic productions, quantitative problem solving, literature research, theatrical rehearsal, creation of lesson plans, review of films and/or dramatic productions, preparation for presentations, lab reports, preparation for clinical experiences, or other assigned work as appropriate to the student learning outcomes of the course.   

    Academic Period and Instructional Time
    The traditional undergraduate academic year consists of a fall and spring semester that are approximately 15 weeks in length with an additional week for final examinations. One credit is awarded for one hour (50 minutes) of classroom instruction per week for the semester of approximately 15 weeks with a minimum of 14 hours of instruction. If a course meets for three 50-minute class periods or two 75-minute class periods per week, it is said to be a three-credit course and has a minimum of 42 hours of classroom instruction.

    The ACCESS academic schedule consists of 11 sessions throughout the calendar year. The majority of the courses run for eight weeks, but ACCESS also offers a winter minimester that runs for 3 weeks, summer sessions that run for 6 weeks, and 4-5 credit courses (e.g., Natural Science courses) that run for 12-14 weeks. Courses are offered either as hybrid or completely online and meet the same number of hours as equivalent full-semester courses by requiring more frequent meetings, longer meeting times, asynchronous/synchronous online meetings, and/or utilizing instructional equivalencies (described below under online and hybrid courses).      

    The academic year for the DPT, MEd, and MSPAS programs consists of fall, spring, and summer sessions that are typically 14 to 16 weeks in length. The academic year for the MBA, MCJ, MSIS, MSN, and DNP programs consists of fall, winter, spring, and summer sessions. The fall, winter, and spring sessions are typically 12 weeks in length, and the summer session is 6 weeks in length. Regardless of whether the graduate programs consist of three or four sessions per year, courses meet the same number of hours as equivalent full-semester courses by requiring more frequent meetings, longer meeting times, asynchronous/synchronous online meetings, and/or utilizing instructional equivalencies.     

    Periodic Review
    Assignment of credit hours for each course is determined by the program/major based on the amount of work required to achieve the course’s student learning outcomes. Undergraduate and graduate students are provided with a course syllabus that conforms with the DeSales’ “Credit Hour Policy.” Faculty are required to submit to Division Heads all course syllabi prior to the start of the semester/session allowing time for review and approval. Final review and approval is made by the dean of undergraduate education for undergraduate courses and the dean of graduate education for graduate courses. In addition, existing courses are evaluated for compliance with federal and state regulations during each program’s five-year self-study and assessment.

    New Course and Approvals
    For the approval of a new course, the “Petition to Present a New Undergraduate (Graduate) Course” is completed by a faculty member and approved by the chair of the major (if applicable), department chair (if applicable), and division head, and is reviewed for compliance by the dean of undergraduate education for undergraduate courses and by the dean of graduate education for graduate courses. This petition must be accompanied by a syllabus which conforms to the “Instructions for Drafting a Course Syllabus” and to the “Credit Hour Policy.” New courses that request inclusion within the core curriculum must receive additional approval from the General Education Core Curriculum Committee.  

    Below are the general guidelines for assigning credit hours to a particular method of instruction.

    Face-to-Face Classroom Instruction
    Face-to-face courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs utilize lectures, discussions, demonstrations, or other methods of instruction. DeSales University’s traditional academic year consists of a fall and spring semester that are approximately 15 weeks in length with an additional week for final examinations. One credit is awarded for one hour (50 minutes) of classroom instruction per week for the semester with a minimum of 14 hours of instruction.

    The following table displays the minimal amount of student activity per credit for face-to-face classroom instruction: 

    Credits Awarded

    Minimum Contact Time per Week

    Minimum Instructional Time for 14 Weeks

    Minimum Out-of-Class Student Work per Week

    Minimum Out-Of-Class Student Work for 14 Weeks

    Total of Contact and Out-Of-Class Student Work For 14 Weeks

    1

    1 hour

    14 hours

    2 hours

    28 hours

    42 hours

    2

    2 hours

    28 hours

    4 hours

    56 hours

    84 hours

    3

    3 hours

    42 hours

    6 hours

    84 hours

    126 hours

    4

    4 hours

    56 hours

    8 hours

    112 hours

    168 hours

    5

    5 hours

    70 hours

    10 hours

    140 hours

    210 hours

     

    Online and Hybrid Courses
    Through a combination of in-class contact hours and online activities, online or hybrid courses must provide the “instructional equivalent” of the number of in-class contact hours delivered in a traditional classroom setting. In the case of a fully online class, all of the instructional hours are calculated through “instructional equivalencies.” DeSales’ formal policy (Documentation of Instructional Equivalency Hours for Online and Hybrid Courses) as well as guidance for instructors (Credit Hour Instructional Equivalency Calculation for Online and Hybrid Courses) are posted for the university community on the MyDSU portal under “Policies & Procedures” in the “Distance Education and Instructional Technology” folder. Online and hybrid courses have the same quality, assessment, learning outcomes, requirements, etc. as courses offered face-to-face. Templates are used for consistency of syllabi across multiple versions of the same course and in the organization of content in Blackboard. A thorough review process is in place whereby the appropriate division head or department chair examines the course syllabus for each online or hybrid course to ensure that the content and rigor is equivalent to that of any classes with the same course number that are offered in the traditional face-to-face classroom setting. Additionally, the Distance Education and Instructional Technology Department reviews each course for proper set-up and use of technology in Blackboard. Instructors are contacted to update or enhance course material as needed. 

    Laboratory Components of Courses
    Laboratories are components of particular face-to-face courses. The laboratory portion of a course is the “hands on” component that supports the didactic (classroom) component of the course. Generally, one credit is awarded for two or three hours of laboratory per week. Online laboratories provide the instructional equivalent of the number of in-class contact hours.   

    Internships
    Internships are supervised learning experiences that take place outside the classroom for which academic credit may be granted. Internship applications are reviewed and approved by the director of the Career Development Center and the student’s faculty supervisor. Internships are limited to students with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 and are ordinarily limited to three credits per semester. Internship applications for more than three credits must also be approved by the student’s division head and the dean of undergraduate education (for traditional undergraduate students) or the dean of lifelong learning (for ACCESS students). Internships are graded pass-fail. Credits awarded are based on the following total hours worked during the internship: 

    Number of Credits

    Number of Total Hours Worked

    During Internship

    3

    135 to 150 hours

    6

    270 to 300 hours

    9

    405 to 450 hours

    12

    540 to 600 hours

      

    Student Teaching
    The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) requires 170 hours of supervised clinical field hours prior to student teaching. Education students seeking certification complete a series of supervised, 1-credit clinical field courses that, when combined, meet the 170 hour requirement. PDE requires a 14-week in-school experience for completion of program requirements for student teaching. During the 14-week in-school experience, 12 credits are awarded for a minimum of 64 days of student teaching.

    Independent Study
    Independent study courses permit a student to study independently and periodically with a faculty member. Independent study proposals are reviewed and approved by the faculty supervisor, the department chair (or division head), and the dean of undergraduate education for undergraduate students and by the faculty supervisor, program director, and dean of graduate education for graduate students. Credit hours are assigned based on the amount of academic activity associated with the course, the faculty supervision, and the amount of outside study (defined above under outside study activities). Most independent study courses are approved for 3 credit hours.

    Tutorials
    At times a student may wish to take a course which is listed in the Undergraduate or Graduate Catalog but which is not scheduled to be offered in a given semester. The student may ask a full-time faculty member (usually one who has previously taught the course) if he/she is willing to offer the course tutorially. Tutorials must match the minimum instructional time and minimum out-of-class student work per week assigned for face-to-face classroom instruction. Tutorial proposals are reviewed and approved by the advisor, the department chair (or division head), and the dean of undergraduate education for undergraduate students and by the advisor, program director, and dean of graduate education for graduate students.

    Supervised Clinical Experience
    For undergraduate nursing (NU) courses, including the required senior-level clinical internship, the credit hour assignment for a supervised clinical experience is based on the following required minimum total clinical hours: 

    Number of Credits

    Minimum Number of Total Clinical Hours Required During Nursing Course

    1

    45 hours total

    2

    90 hours total

    4

    180 hours total

    For the Physician Assistant, Nursing, and Physical Therapy graduate programs, credit for clinical experience is generally determined by their specific accrediting agencies (see the Graduate Catalog).                    

    Practicum/Studio Courses, Applied Music, and Ensembles  
    Practicum/studio courses, applied music lessons, and ensembles in the Performing Arts Division (theatre, dance, tv/film) are assigned credits based on the learning outcomes and student workload expectations within a specified period of academically-engaged time as determined by the program/major.

    Research in Natural Science Department
    During research courses, students conduct research in collaboration with a faculty member who has expertise in the subject matter. In the Natural Science Department (biology, chemistry, and biochemistry-molecular biology), one credit is awarded for a minimum time commitment of 3 hours per week for at least 14 weeks.

  • Cross-Registration at LVAIC Institutions

    DeSales University students are offered the opportunity to cross-register at any one of the five LVAIC institutions (Cedar Crest College, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College, or Muhlenburg College) provided that necessary approvals at the home and host institutions are obtained.

    What effect will cross-registered courses have on my GPA?

    Some students take courses at other institutions with the hopes of raising their GPA. DeSales University will accept the grades from LVAIC institutions and these grades will be calculated into a student's GPA. While we do accept credits from other non-LVAIC institutions, it is important to recognize that non-LVAIC credits are not calculated in your GPA.

    What do I need to know to participate in cross-registration?

    • Students wishing to participate must visit http://www.lvaic.org/for-students/cross-registration/ and follow the procedures listed.
    • Courses available on this campus or courses taken as an overload may not be cross-registered.
    • A maximum of one course per semester may be cross-registered.
    • Courses are offered on a space-available basis. Therefore, students should not assume that they will be able to get into the course that they desire.
    • The grades for all cross-registered courses are automatically computed into a student's grade point average.
    • Freshmen usually may not participate in this cross-registration policy.

     

  • Dean's List

    To be eligible for the Dean's List, you must have taken no fewer than 12 semester 
    hours for credit (excluding pass/fail classes) and attained a grade point average of 3.25 
    or better.

    A student with a grade of Incomplete in a course for a given semester is not eligible 
    for the Dean's List that semester. 

  • DeSales Email Policy

    DeSales Email Policy

    Email ownership

    The computer networks and email servers that support members of the DeSales community at all locations are the property of the University. Emails resident on University servers, whether personal or related to the business of the University, are the property of the University and not the property of the email account holder, be they student, faculty, administrative staff, or consultant.

    University use of email

    Email is an official mechanism of communication within DeSales University. The University has the right to expect that such communications will be received and read in a timely fashion. Official email communications are intended only to meet the academic and administrative needs of the campus community. The Registrar's Office is responsible for directing the use of the official student email. See Guidelines for the Use of Official Student Email Addresses at the end of this policy for details.

    Only University faculty, staff, and students and other persons who have received permission under the appropriate University authority are authorized users of the University's electronic mail systems and resources.

    Email is not meant to replace traditional paper mailings of critical importance or mailings that would require a legal copy or written notification to a student, such as a signed letter or registered letter. Messages containing confidential information such as course grades, financial aid award amounts, or tuition/fee payment amounts should still be handled pursuant to existing departmental policy.

    Assignment of student email

    DeSales University will provide all students (undergraduate, ACCESS, and graduate) with an email account at the time that a student's deposit has been received and processed.

    This email account must be activated before the University can correspond with the student using their official email address. The official email address will be maintained in the Student Information System. The student's official email address will be included in directory information unless the student requests otherwise. [Directory information is personally identifiable student information and includes: the student's name, local and permanent address, telephone number(s), email address, photographs, electronic images, date and place of birth, major field(s) of study and current curriculum, participation in officially recognized activities, dates of attendance, degrees, and awards received, previous educational institution(s) attended, and program and promotion materials on participants in various sports and similar public activities, including weights and heights of members of athletic teams.]

    Redirecting of email

    If a student wishes to have email redirected from their official DeSales University address to another email address (e.g., @aol.com, @hotmail.com, or some other email account), they may do so, but at their own risk. The University will provide a mechanism that allows students to forward their official University email to another email address. The University will not be responsible for the handling of email by outside vendors. Having email redirected does not absolve a student from the responsibilities associated with official communication sent to his or her DeSales University account. Information and warnings about forwarding are available on the MyDSU Portal.

    Expectations about student use of email

    Students are expected to check their email on a frequent and consistent basis (minimally once per week) in order to stay current with University-related communications. Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical. "I didn't check my email", an error in forwarding mail, or email returned to the University with "Mailbox Full" or "User Unknown" are not acceptable excuses for missing official University communications via email.

    Students have the right to request that the University not communicate with them by email, but instead use an alternative form of communication. A student who does not own a computer or have access to the Internet might request an alternative form of communication. To request this, the student must notify the Registrar's Office in writing that he or she wishes not to be communicated with by email, and specify the form of communication and the location that the student will receive that communication. Requesting and using an alternative form of communication does not absolve the student of the responsibility to frequently monitor and respond to University communications.

    Authentication for confidential information

    It is a violation of University policies, including the Student Code of Conduct, for any user of official email addresses to impersonate a University office, faculty/staff member, or student. To minimize this risk, some confidential information may be made available only through a password protected web site. In these cases, students will receive email correspondence directing them to the web site, where they can access the confidential information only by supplying their user name and password. The confidential information will not be available in the email message.

    Privacy

    Users should exercise extreme caution in using email to communicate confidential or sensitive matters, and should not assume that email is private and confidential. It is especially important that users are careful to send messages only to the intended recipient(s). Particular care should be taken when using the "reply" command during email correspondence.

    The University will make reasonable efforts to maintain the integrity and effective operation of its electronic mail systems, but users are advised that those systems should in no way be regarded as a secure medium for the communication of sensitive or confidential information. Because of the nature and technology of electronic communication, the University can assure neither the privacy of an individual's use of the University's electronic mail resources nor the confidentiality of particular messages that may be created, transmitted, received, or stored thereby.

    Educational uses of email

    Faculty will determine how electronic forms of communication (e.g., email) will be used in their classes. This "Official Student Email Policy" will ensure that all students will be able to comply with email-based course requirements specified by faculty. Faculty can therefore make the assumption that students' official DeSales University email accounts are being accessed, and faculty can use email for their classes accordingly. The University will, with respect to email based course requirements, comply with all aspects of the ADA.

    Student Personal Email Use

    University student email may be used for incidental personal purposes provided that, in addition to the foregoing constraints and conditions, such use does not: 1) directly or indirectly interfere with the University operation of computing facilities of email services or 2) burden the University with noticeable incremental cost. Email records arising from such personal use may, however, be subject to the restrictions set forth above.

    Prohibited Usage

    Prohibited uses of electronic mail include, but are not limited to

    • Personal use of the email system that creates a direct cost for the University
    • Use of the University's email resources for personal monetary gain or for commercial purposes that are not directly related to University business
    • Sending copies of documents in violation of copyright laws
    • Inclusion of the work of others into electronic mail communications in violation of copyright laws
    • Capture and "opening" of electronic mail except as required in order for authorized employees to diagnose and correct delivery problems
    • Use of electronic mail to harass or intimidate others or to interfere with the ability of others to conduct University business
    • Use of electronic mail systems for any purpose restricted or prohibited by laws or University regulations
    • "Spoofing," i.e., constructing an electronic mail communication so it appears to be from someone else
    • Attempting unauthorized access to electronic mail or attempting to breach any security measures on any electronic mail system, or attempting to intercept any electronic mail transmissions without proper authorization
    • Any offensive or disruptive messages, including any messages which contain sexual implications, racial slurs, gender-specific comments, or any other comment that offensively addresses someone's age, gender, religious or political beliefs, national origin, or disability
    • Forwarding or sending viruses

    University Access and Disclosure

    General Provisions

    Email on the DeSales University email system is the property of the University and not the property of the student.

    1. DeSales University reserves and intends to exercise the right to review, audit, intercept, access, and disclose all messages created, received, or sent over the electronic mail system for any purpose. Accordingly, the confidentiality of any message should not be assumed. Even when a message is erased or deleted from the University computer system, it is still possible to retrieve and read that message. Further, the use of passwords for security does not guarantee confidentiality.
    2. Students and other nonstudent users are advised that the University's electronic mail systems should be treated like a shared filing system, i.e., with the expectation that
      communications sent or received on University business or with the use of University resources may be made available for review by any authorized University official for purposes related to University business.
    3. Electronic mail of students may constitute "education records" subject to the provisions of the federal statute known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). The University may access, inspect, and disclose such records under conditions that are set forth in the statute.

    Monitoring of Communications

    The University will not monitor electronic mail as a routine matter but it may do so to the extent permitted by law as the University deems necessary for purposes of maintaining the integrity and effective operation of the University's electronic mail systems.

    Limitations on Disclosure and Use of Information Obtained by Means of Access or Monitoring

    The contents of electronic mail communications, properly obtained for University purposes, may be disclosed without permission of the email account owner.

    Filtering of email

    The University reserves the right to filter email to reduce the quantity of spam. The University is not responsible for any email that may not be received due to the filtering of email.

    Disciplinary Action

    Students and nonstudent users who violate this Policy in any way will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action based upon the facts and circumstances of each infraction.

    Guidelines for the Use of Official Student Email Addresses

    DeSales University has established official student email addresses to enable faculty, staff and administrators to communicate more effectively and efficiently with students. See the Official Student Email Policy for policies governing the use of this email address.

    Appropriate use of email addresses is essential to the success of this mode for contacting students. On one hand, if the address is used to communicate too much information too often, particularly if the information is perceived to be unimportant, students will abandon the system. On the other hand, if sensitive, confidential information is communicated via email, student's privacy rights may be violated. This document is intended to assure the appropriate use of student email, in particular those messages sent from University administrators, faculty and staff to students. Students may choose to use their email accounts more broadly than prescribed by these guidelines.

    General guidelines

    • Keep messages simple and direct.
    • When possible, send email messages only to the specific group of students for whom the message is pertinent.
    • When a message is to be sent to many recipients, use an email program that will not list all the recipients in the message alternatively, include all recipients' addresses as "Bcc:" instead of "To:"
    • When a message is to be sent to more than 1,000 students, send separate mailings in groups of no more than 1,000 email addresses each.
    • Limit the size of attachments when sending messages to groups of students. Departments are encouraged to post student attachments to a web page and refer to that site within the email, rather than include an attachment to each student email.
    • A "From:" or Reply-to:" name and email address of the sender is required.
    • Encourage students to check their DeSales email accounts regularly or to forward their account to an address that they will check regularly.
    • Ensure that nondirectory information (see definition of directory information in the Official Student Email Policy) is not sent to the student through email. Email is not considered a confidential means of communication.

    Examples of appropriate uses

    • Communicating commencement and convocation information
    • Degree check information
    • Notification concerning students' change of course schedules (drop/adds), general petitions, withdrawals, and residency
    • Notification of cancellation of registration
    • Student aid processing issues and deadlines
    • Academic departmental information such as class changes, registration issues, new courses, job opening lists, and events
    • Math and English placement information
    • New student information about academic support services and academic policies
    • Advising appointments
    • Notices about student internships and workshops Payment deadlines and other Bursar information General Education Program information
    • Link to a Survey

    Examples of inappropriate uses

    • Information unrelated to University business
    • Surveys (See Survey Guidelines for special instructions concerning the use of email for surveys.)
    • Solicitation
    • Mass mailing of political advertising or promotion of products not related to University functions or activities
    • Mailings of critical importance that would traditionally require a legal copy or notification to a student, such as a signed letter or registered letter.
    • Personal information
    • Surveys that do not serve sanctioned University purposes.
    • Messages containing confidential information such as course grades, financial aid award amounts, or tuition/fee payment amounts
    • Email that violates the Official Student Email Policy
  • Dropping a Course

    There is a one-week period at the beginning of each semester, called the Drop-Add Period, during which you may drop and add courses for that semester and not be penalized. This applies to all day students who are taking either day courses or ACCESS courses in any session. This transaction may be completed in webadvisor by clicking on "Register or Drop Sections" after logging in. However, before altering your courses, you should always discuss the potential change(s) with your advisor. You may not add another course to your schedule after the Drop-Add Period. This also applies to ACCESS courses.

    Please note that there is a difference between dropping a course and withdrawing from a course.

  • Dual Majors

    Hard-working, highly motivated, and academically superior students may want to consider a Dual Major. In such cases, it is important to understand that the degree will be awarded in only one of these majors. However, the second major will appear on your transcript.

    It is important to plan your program of study to show how the requirements of each of your majors will be met. Seek advice from your current advisor and an advisor in the area of your second major. Then, complete these steps:

    • Print a copy of the Dual Major Form.
    • Obtain approval from the appropriate department chairpersons, discussing with them your proposed program of studies, and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office.
  • General Requirements for Graduation

    DeSales University states its graduation requirements in terms of three-credit courses, not the number of credits. In order to graduate, a student must:

    • Complete at least 40 courses, plus three semesters of physical education 
      (PE 100 plus two PE activity courses); the courses must each be three 
      credits or more for a total of at least 120 credit hours.

    • Achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.000 for all courses presented 
      for the degree.

    • Achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.000 for courses required by and
      offered by the major.

    • 15 courses at DSU, 5 of which must be in the student’s major

  • GPA Resources

    Improving Your GPA

    Students wishing to raise their GPA may not realize that they have the opportunity to repeat a course in which they have received a grade of D, D+, or F. Please see the Undergraduate Catalog for complete information about this policy. Some students take courses at other institutions with the hopes of raising their GPA. However, please note that DeSales University only accepts the grades from our five partner institutions in the LVAIC consortium. As a result, while we do accept credits from other non-LVAIC institutions, those non-LVAIC credits do not affect your GPA. Learn more about taking courses through LVAIC institutions.

    Estimating Your GPA Using the GPA Wizard

    The GPA Wizard allows you to explore how your GPA may change in the future depending upon a variety of circumstances. You can choose from several options including:

    • Estimate your anticipated Term GPA (commonly called "Semester GPA") and then see how that Term GPA would impact your Cumulative GPA
    • Estimate the impact of repeating courses and then learn what type of grades you would need in order to reach a target Cumulative GPA
    • Learn what type of grades you would need in order to reach a target Cumulative GPA (without repeating any courses)
    • Chart your semester-by-semester progress using either Term GPA or Cumulative GPA

    Be sure to read all directions carefully so that you can maximize the potential of the GPA Wizard. Please note that you will need Microsoft Excel 2007 or a converter for earlier versions of Microsoft Excel.

    Estimating Your GPA By Hand

    Students can identify their Grade Point Average (GPA) in WebAdvisor. For the Cumulative GPA, click on "Transcript" (under the Academic Profile heading of the main menu) and scroll to the bottom of this page. For your GPA in a particular term, click on "Grade Point Average by Term" (also under Academic Profile) and select the semester or term of interest to you.

    In some cases, you may need more information than you can find in WebAdvisor. For example, you may wish to determine your GPA in your major (sometimes useful for resumes) or you may wish to estimate your anticipated GPA after the current semester. Using a very simple formula and a calculator, you can determine your Cumulative GPA, your Term GPA, and/or your GPA in Major.

    First, you will need a list of the courses for which you want to calculate the GPA. This list must include the number of credits for each course and the grade for each course. You can obtain this information from WebAdvisor. If you are estimating your future GPA, you can insert your anticipated grades.

    For example, if you were attempting to estimate your term GPA for the current semester, your list might look like this:

    Course Credits

    Anticipated Grade

    EN 103 3 A-
    BI 242 4 B
    PS 109 3 A
    SP 101 3 C+
    MG 201 3 A-
    PE 100 1

    Pass

    Second, you will need to determine how many grade points each individual letter grade is worth. The Grading System, as found in the Undergraduate Catalog, will help you with this:

    Grade Grade Points
    A 4.0
    A- 3.7
    B+ 3.3
    B 3.0
    B- 2.7
    C+ 2.3
    C 2.0
    C- 1.7
    D+ 1.3
    D 1.0
    F 0.0

    Please note that neither pass-fail courses nor audited courses are calculated into your GPA. Furthermore, only the grades from transfer courses taken at LVAIC institutions will be computed into your GPA. All transfer courses from other institutions outside of the LVAIC consortium will not be calculated into your GPA, although the credits may be accepted.

    Since a B is worth 3.0 grade points, if you receive a B in a four-credit course, you have a total of 12 grade points (3.0 grade point X four-credits = 12 grade points). Go back to your original table of grades, and add a column for grade points.

    Course Credits Anticipated Grade Grade Points
    EN 103 3 A- 3 X 3.7 = 11.1
    BI 242 4 B 4 X 3.0 = 12.0
    PS 109 3 A 3 X 4.0 = 12.0
    SP 101 3 C+ 3 X 2.3 = 6.9
    MG 201 3 A- 3 X 3.7 = 11.1
    PE 100 1 Pass Pass-Fail Not Calculated

    Third, determine your total number of credits (excluding any pass-fail courses, audited courses, or non-LVAIC transfer courses), as well as your total grade points.

    Course Credits Anticipated Grade Grade Points
    EN 103 3 A- 11.1
    BI 242 4 B 12.0
    PS 109 3 A 12.0
    SP 101 3 C+ 6.9
    MG 201 3 A- 11.1
    PE 100 1 Pass Pass-Fail Not Calculated
    TOTAL 16   53.1

    Fourth, divide the total grade points by the total credits to determine your Grade Point Average. In the example provided above, 53.1 / 16 = 3.319 (rounded up). So, if this student were correct about the anticipated grades inserted into his/her list, then 3.319 would ultimately be the final Term GPA.

    While your list of courses may be longer if you are attempting to determine your Cumulative GPA or the GPA for courses in your major, the formula will remain the same.

    Suggestion: If your cumulative GPA does not seem impressive enough on your resume, your GPA in major courses could prove more helpful. For more information about how to insert your GPA into your resume, please contact the Director of Career Services.

  • Incomplete Grades

    An "incomplete" indicates that a student, through no fault of his or her own, was unable to complete the course requirements within the regular term.

    An "incomplete"must be made up within four calendar months of the last day of the class of the semester in which the "incomplete"was given.

    If it is not made up by this date, the "I", (Incomplete) automatically becomes an "F".  (N.B. See the ACCESS Calendar for the deadlines for Incompletes in ACCESS courses.)

  • Institutional Review Board (IRB)

    The DeSales IRB Committee has the responsibility and full capabilities to review and monitor biomedical and socio-behavioral research that involves human subjects in which DeSales is engaged before the involvement of human subjects may begin.

    Find all related information (e.g. application, policies and procedures, etc.) on the Institutional Review Board website.

  • Language Requirements

    International applicants (regardless of citizenship) whose native language is not English are required to submit English proficiency test scores as part of their application. English proficiency test scores are also required if an applicant attended secondary school in a non-English-speaking country.

    Language Requirement Exceptions

    • A score of 550 or above on the SAT Evidence-based Reading or 24 or better on the ACT English section
    • If an applicant attended a U.S. high school or secondary school for at least three years and was enrolled in a traditional academic curriculum without ESOL coursework
    • If an applicant attended another U.S. community college, college, or university full-time for at least two years without ESOL coursework
    • Other exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis by the Director of International Learning

    Undergraduate admissions requires the following minimum scores on the TOEFL, iELTS, or the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CAE).

     

    TOEFL

    iELTS

    Cambridge (CAE)

    Undergraduate
    Admissions

    80 ibt

    6.5

    B2.II or higher

    Please note that individual academic programs may require a higher score. Applicants to the Nursing (Traditional BSN (Freshmen or Transfer), Accelerated BSN, RN to BSN, ACCESS Evening-Weekend), Medical Studies (Physician Assistant), or Health Science (Physical Therapy) programs, may take only TOEFL iBT and must obtain a total score of 100 with a minimum score of 26 for speaking.

    An official copy of test results must be sent by the testing agency directly to the appropriate program at DeSales University, 2755 Station Avenue, Center valley, PA 18034.

    The TOEFL iBT must have been taken within two years of application to a DeSales program.

    Visit the TSE Web site at http://www.ets.org/toefl for up-to-date information. 

  • Overloading

    A normal course load consists of five three or more credit courses. To "overload" means taking an additional course of three or more credits, or an additional three one-credit courses, excluding physical education courses.

    Requirements for Overloading

    If your grade point average at the end of the previous semester was 3.0 or better and you have the approval of your advisor, you may overload one course of three or more credits per semester.

    • Three one-credit courses in a semester may also be an overload, unless one of these is a physical education course.
    • If you have a cumulative grade point average of 3.25, you may be permitted an overload of more than one course per semester subject to the approval of your advisor.

    What is the procedure for getting an overload approved?

    • When you meet with your advisor to discuss registering for the following semester's courses, speak about the possibility of overloading.
    • At pre-registration, it is only possible to register for a "normal" course load. You will need to complete an Approval Form and obtain the required signature.
    • Return the form to the Registrar's Office.
  • Pass-Fail Option

    Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may take one course during a semester under the pass-fail option (exclusive of PE courses), provided that the course is a free elective. It must not be a core requirement, a major requirement, or a controlled elective.

    What is the procedure for getting a pass-fail course approved?

    • Complete the appropriate section of the Approval Form.
    • Obtain the approval of your academic advisor and the instructor of the course.
    • Submit to the Registrar's Office.

    May I change from Pass-Fail to a letter grade, or from a letter grade to Pass-Fail, after the course has begun?

    Yes, you may change from one to the other, within one month of the first day of the semester with the permission of the instructor, the Academic Dean, and your academic advisor. See the Academic Calendar for precise dates. (N.B. Consult the ACCESS calendar, if you are taking an ACCESS course.)

  • Policy for Protection of Minors

    This Policy establishes guidelines designed to provide a safe environment for minors when on the DeSales University campus, or while participating in University-sponsored activities off campus. This Policy is intended to apply to University-sponsored activities involving minors, and programs for minors sponsored by non-University organizations that operate in University facilities.

    Download the Policy for Protection of Minors.
  • Printing

    At DeSales University, we want to encourage users to collaborate and distribute documents digitally, rather than printing to a paper document. By doing this, the University's goals to achieve sustainability, become environmentally responsible, and reduce cost are met. To assist with these goals, DeSales University IT launched Paper Cut software to all faculty, staff, and students in August 2013. Paper Cut shows user's printing habits and gives the ability to print wirelessly to any public printer on campus. A link to Paper Cut is provided on the MyDSU portal.

    Page allotments per semester:

    • Faculty and Staff = 1,000 pages
    • Students = 500 pages.

    As users print, pages are deducted from their personal balance.

    Once students reach -50 page balance, they will be unable to print to a network printer. On request to the Help Desk, student balances will be reset to 100 pages.

  • Receiving Credit for Internships

    Students may complete internships for credit in collaboration with a faculty supervisor, provided that they meet minimum criteria and follow procedures specified by the Career Development Center. For more information visit www.desales.edu/career and/or the Career Development Center in Dooling Hall.

     

  • Registering for Courses

    Near the end of each semester, students planning to return the following semester need to register for classes. These are the steps that you should follow:

    • Check the Academic Calendar to identify which week will be registration week.
    • In the weeks leading up to registration, log-in to Web Advisor and click on "Registration Status and Time" to see the specific time at which you may begin to register.
    • Approximately two weeks before registration, begin preparing a tentative schedule of courses.
    • One to two weeks prior to registration (during Advisor Consultation Week, as published in the Academic Calendar), you should meet with your academic advisor to discuss the courses that you plan to take, review mid-term grades, and ensure that you are on track for graduation. Your advisor must clear you in his/her Web Advisor account before you will be able to register.
    • Please note that students with a financial hold will not be permitted to register until the matter is resolved with the Business Office.
    • Log-in to Web Advisor at the assigned time and click "Search and register for classes."  Add desired classes to preferred sections and then submit preferred sections to complete registration. For more detailed assistanced, view our printable instructions with screenshots.
  • Repeating Courses

    Students may repeat courses in which a grade of C-, D+, D, or F was earned. After repeating a course, both the original grade and the repeated grade appear on the transcript but only the higher grade earned is used in the calculation of the GPA. Ordinarily, a student  may  repeat  a  course  only  once,  but  in  case  a  student twice fails a course required for graduation, the student may petition the advisor and the dean of undergraduate education, or dean of lifelong learning for ACCESS, to be allowed to take the course a third time.

    For courses repeated elsewhere, the transfer grade will not replace the DeSales grade (except for courses taken through LVAIC Cross-Registration). See Transfer Courses below and Cross-Registration at LVAIC Institutions above for additional information.

    All nursing students are required to achieve a grade of C+ or higher in all nursing courses. Any nursing student who receives less than a C+ may repeat that nursing course once. A nursing student can repeat a total of one (1) nursing course throughout the BSN curriculum. All nursing courses must be repeated at DeSales University.

    Please see the Undergraduate Catalog for complete information about this policy.

  • S.E.A.L. Campus Posting Policy

    Updated March 2012

    General Overview

    • Postings/Decorations of any kind must have the prior approval of the Student Engagement and Leadership Office.  The Office will stamp the original posting to verify approval and it will be signed and dated.  Exceptions are the Athletic Department, Residence Life and Safety Director who will stamp their own postings.
    • Original postings should be approved before photocopying.  There will be a limit of 15 flyers per event. Any unauthorized postings/decorations will be removed and the organizer will be contacted.

    • Postings/Decorations are prohibited on the following in McShea, Dooling, DUC and Billera:
      • Doors
      • Walls
      • Windows
      • Stairwells
      • Public Safety Hallway in McShea
      • Pillars

    • All postings/decorations must have the event name, sponsor, contact, date, time and location. 

    • All expired postings /decorations must be removed by the event sponsor within two days of the end of the event.  

    • All postings/decorations must conform to the philosophy and objectives of DeSales University and student regulations.  
    • All postings/decorations advertising alcohol or drugs are deemed offensive and will not be permitted.  
    • A copy of all postings will be kept on file in the Student Engagement and Leadership Office and a representative of the Office will check all boards once a week.
    • There will be ONE representative from each group on campus that will be the contact for the Office of Student Engagement and Leadership. For each academic division, the administrative assistant will serve this role.  
    • DeSales University reserves the right to remove notices posted by those who are not members of the University community. This includes the following examples:
      • Alcoholic Beverage Companies or Establishments
      • Tanning Salons
      • Tobacco Companies
      • Credit Card Companies 
      • Anything that is not in compliance with the University mission or contrary to Catholic beliefs.

    Bulletin Board Usage

    • Where bulletin boards are provided pushpins and staples are to be used when available.
    • Duct Tape, Glue and/or Paste are strictly prohibited.
    • Only one flyer per event per bulletin board will be allowed. 

    Building Overviews

    • McShea Student Center
      • In bathrooms above urinals or in stalls in clear plastic holders with prior approval of the Student Engagement and Leadership Office.  
      • Table Tents throughout the building in clear plastic holders.
      • Bulletin Boards – Each bulletin board in McShea is marked for a specific office by a blue or red marker. There are a number of general announcement boards.
      • TV’s – Flyers via the Visix System   Please contact the Coordinator for Student Services and Data for posting.  
      • Dooling Hall
        • In bathrooms above urinals or in stalls in clear plastic holders with prior approval of the Student Engagement and Leadership Office. 
        • TV’s – Flyers via the Visix System.   Please contact the Coordinator for Student Services and Data for posting.
        • Flyers –.  Individual office and academic departments will police the bulletin boards in their area.
        • DUC
          • TV’s – Flyers via the Visik System.   Please contact the Coordinator for Student Services and Data for posting.
          • Table Tents – One placed on each table in the Dining Area.
          • Posters – Student Groups are allowed to use poster paper from the Office of Student Engagement and Leadership to be hung on the wall to the left of the entrance of the dining area. Masking tape or blue painters tape only may be used to affix these posters.
          • Bulletin Boards – There are a number of general announcement boards.

    • Billera Hall
      • TV’s – Flyers via the Visix System.   Please contact the Coordinator for Student Services and Data. 

    • Residence Halls
      • Flyers – One flyer needed per RA; 53 Total.
      • Please refer to the Residence Hall Decorating and Posting Policy. 

    • The following areas on campus will be policed by the administrators of that building. 
      • Tucker House, Buckley Center, Lawless Center, Hurd Science Center, Labuda Center for Performing Arts, Wills Hall, Chappuis Hall, Trexler Library, Campbell Hall. 

    Outside Grounds

    • Signage is prohibited on the following which are defined as outside grounds; lamp posts, street, way finding and building signs, sidewalks, exterior walls and utility poles, trees and other immobile objects considered part of the property. Outside signage must be freestanding and its design and location must receive approval by the office of Student Engagement and Leadership.
    • Chalking is not permitted on campus except outside of the McShea Center or DeSales University Center with permission from the Office of Student Engagement and Leadership.

    Overview of Alternative Marketing and Advertising


    DeSales University Web/Technology

    • Student Engagement and Leadership Office Online Calendar via R25 Room Reservation System
    • Student Engagement and Leadership Office Email to Student Leaders and Classes
    • Student Engagement and Leadership Office Webpage
    • DSU Daily Posting and Weekly Video Highlights

    Twitter, Text and Facebook

    • Facebook – DeSales University Student Engagement and Leadership Page
    • Facebook – DeSales University Student Activities Page 
    • Create your own Facebook Group or Event Page
    • Twitter – DSUengagement
    • Twitter – DSUstudentactivities
    • Create your own Twitter page
    • Text Messaging – Contact Student Engagement and Leadership Office - Text ‘activities’ to 313131 to join! Standard text messaging rates apply. You can opt out at any time

    For more information on DeSales Social Media Policy please go to the following link desales.edu/SocialMediaPolicy

    Media Outlets

    • The Minstrel - Campus Newspaper
    • Visix Television System
    • What’s Going On weekly promo video

    Paper Flyers

    • General 8½”x 11” Flyers
    • What’s going On Calendar in McShea
    • Student Engagement and Leadership Event Wall Calendars
    • Large Posters – Paper from Student Engagement Office
    • Quarter Page Flyers through Campus Mail
    • Black and White Brochure

    Other Methods 

    • Word of Mouth
    • Clothing
    • Promo Items - Glasses, Rally Towels, Flags
    • Announcements during sporting events
    • Promotional items to give out


  • Sexual Offense Policy

    Please see desales.edu/titleix .

  • Student Identity Verification in Distance and Correspondence Education

    A student who enrolls in a DeSales University distance education (both online and hybrid) or correspondence education course is given a secure login and pass code.  This method of verifying student identity protects the privacy of student information.  The student is not charged a fee for this verification of student identity.  Each user of DeSales University’s learning management system is responsible for maintaining his/her secure login and pass code, which may not be given to or shared with anyone else.  To encourage academic integrity and protect students’ original work, DeSales University provides its faculty with SafeAssign ™ plagiarism detection software and Respondus Lockdown Browser ™ and Respondus Monitor ™ for securing the online test environment. Faculty are responsible for ensuring that their courses are designed to employ assessment methods that support the academic integrity provided by this student identity verification policy.  

    The Office of the Provost is responsible for ensuring compliance with the DeSales Student Identity Verification policy in all the University’s credit-bearing courses.  The Provost’s Office reviews the policy annually with the assistance of the Department of Distance Education and Instructional Technology (DEIT) and Department of Information Technology (IT) to ensure continuing compliance with the federal regulations and to revise the DeSales University policy as necessary.

  • Summer Courses

    Prior approval for all transfer coursework completed at other institutions after matriculation to DeSales must be secured from the Associate Dean of Academic Life for traditional day students or the Dean of Lifelong Learning for ACCESS students if the student wishes to transfer the work to his/her program at DeSales. 

    Traditional day students must complete the appropriate section for proposed transfer courses on the Approval Form, secure departmental or division signatures where applicable (i.e., in cases where a course is required for the student’s major), and present it for approval to the Associate Dean of Academic Life with a catalog description of the course to be taken. ACCESS students should consult with their ACCESS Academic Advisor. At the conclusion of the course, the student must request that an official transcript be sent from the other college or university to the DeSales Registrar’s Office. The Registrar’s Office will validate the approved transfer of credit upon receipt of this transcript, provided that the student has earned a grade of C- or better for each course. 

    Only credit is transferred. The grades for transfer courses are not calculated in the student’s GPA at DeSales. An exception is that grades earned at LVAIC institutions (Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges: Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, Muhlenberg, and Lehigh) via the cross-registration process are included in the calculation of the student’s DeSales GPA.

    DeSales University has established agreements with several community colleges. These agreements include many courses that have been pre-approved for transfer to DeSales. If you select one of these pre-approved courses, you can bypass many of the steps above and simply bring your approval form to the Associate Dean of Academic Life or the Dean of Lifelong Learning for a signature.

  • Transfer Policy

    The following regulations govern the transfer of credits into DeSales University. In all cases, transfer courses must be documented by an official transcript. In some cases, additional information, including syllabi, course descriptions, or other supporting materials may be required.

    1)   With the exception of internships, all 3-credit courses taken at institutions accredited by the following regional accrediting bodies recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation or by the U.S. Department of Education (namely, Middle States Commission on Higher Education, Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and Western Association of Schools and Colleges) are eligible for transfer consideration at DeSales if the courses are meant to be transferable, are completed with a grade of C- or higher, and are consistent with DeSales' mission, philosophy, and liberal arts tradition.

    2)   The acceptance or denial of transfer credit is not determined exclusively on the basis of the accreditation of the sending institution or the mode of delivery, but, rather, considers course equivalencies, including expected student learning outcomes and comparison with DeSales' curricula and standards. Courses that are accepted for transfer must be substantially equal in quantity and quality to the DeSales work for which they are offered as a substitute.

    3)   No course in which a grade below C- was earned is accepted for transfer credit, except in the case that the student has completed an A.A. (Associate of Arts) or A.S. (Associate of Science) degree. All credits earned in an associate degree program and meant to be transferable will be transferred to DeSales, provided that the student achieved (a) a minimum cumulative GPA (Grade Point Average) of 2.0 for all courses presented for the DeSales degree and (b) a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 for courses required in and offered by the major at DSU. If the student has not satisfied both (a) and (b), the student’s courses will be evaluated individually, and only courses in which a C- or higher has been earned will transfer into DeSales.

    4)   A student must complete at least 15 courses of three or more credits at DeSales to earn a degree from DeSales. A student can transfer a maximum of 25 courses of three or more credits into DeSales. A minimum of 40 courses of three or more credits are required to earn a DeSales degree.

    5)   A student must complete 5 courses in the major at DeSales. (There are several professional programs, e.g., nursing and education, that have additional requirements imposed by their individual accreditation agencies. Please check with the chair or director of those DeSales programs.)

    6)   All nursing (NU) courses with a required laboratory or clinical component must be completed at DeSales. For additional information, refer to the Nursing heading in Section 8 of the Undergraduate Catalog.

    7)   Only credit is transferred. The grades for transfer courses are not calculated in the student’s DeSales GPA. An exception is that grades earned at LVAIC institutions (Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges: Lehigh University and Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, and Muhlenberg Colleges) via the cross registration process are included in the calculation of the student’s DeSales GPA. Once courses have been transferred, they become part of the student’s permanent record and cannot be removed.

    8)   Courses not using traditional letter grades (A-F) will be considered for transfer only if additional documentation detailing successful completion of the courses is provided.

    # of transferred courses

    0-7 courses

    8-17 courses

    18 or more courses

    Courses you are exempt
    from taking*

    No
    Exemptions

    PL 109: Philosophical Thinking

    PL 109: Philosophical Thinking

    MOT (Modes of Thinking) Social Science

    MOT (Modes of Thinking) Social Science

    EN 103: Communication & Thought

    EN 103: Communication & Thought

    EN 104: Communication & Thought II**

    EN 104: Communication & Thought II**

    World Cultures/Foreign Language I

    World Cultures/Foreign Language I

    World Cultures/Foreign Language II

    World Cultures/Foreign Language II

    PE 100: Lifetime Fitness & Wellness

    PE 100: Lifetime Fitness & Wellness

    PE Activities

    PE Activities

     

    Humanities I

     

    Humanities II

     

    MOT Mathematics

     

    MOT Natural Science

     

    MOT Literature

     

    TH 109: Introduction to Catholic Theology

     

    9) Courses taught online or in a hybrid format will be accepted assuming they meet the criteria above.

    10) DeSales courses are assigned as credit hours. Courses evaluated for transfer from colleges and universities with different systems (e.g., quarter hours, units) are converted into credits.

    11) The dean of undergraduate education is responsible for the final determination of the acceptance or denial of transfer credit.

    12) Depending on status at the time of admittance, students will be exempt from certain parts of the University’s general education core as noted below:

          Transfer with 8 to 17 courses

          If students enter at the sophomore level (i.e., have transferred 8 to 17 courses of 3 or more credits each), they are exempt from:

          a)   MOT (Modes of Thinking) Philosophy

    b)   MOT Social Science

    c)   Composition and Rhetoric I (EN103)

    d)   Composition and Rhetoric II (EN104), provided they have transferred at least one three-credit English composition course which included the writing of a research paper. If they have not written an acceptable research paper, they must take Composition and Rhetoric II.

    e)   World Cultures I

    f)   World Cultures II

    g)   PE 100 + two activities courses (traditional day students only)

          Transfer with 18 to 25 courses

          If students enter at the junior level (i.e., have transferred 18 to 25 courses of 3 or more credits each), they are exempt from the general education courses typically required in the freshman and sophomore years, namely:

    a)   MOT Philosophy

    b)   MOT Social Science

    c)   Composition and Rhetoric I (EN 103)

    d)   Composition and Rhetoric II (EN 104), provided they have transferred at least one three-credit English composition course which included the writing of a research paper. If they have not written an acceptable research paper, they must take Composition and Rhetoric II.

    e)   World Cultures I

    f)   World Cultures II

    g)   Humanities I

    h)   Humanities II

    i)    MOT Mathematics

    j)    MOT Natural Science

    k)   MOT Literature

    l)    Introduction to Catholic Theology

    m)  PE 100 + two activities courses (traditional day students only)

    13) Traditional day and ACCESS students are required to fulfill (either at DeSales or through equivalent courses taken at another institution) the remaining general education requirements, namely:

    a)   Humanities III – Great Works of Art and Music

    b)   Humanities IV – Great Works of Literature

    c)   Intermediate Theology

    d)   Values Seminar

    14) Core-to-Core Agreement - The DeSales University general education core will essentially be fulfilled by the core of affiliated community colleges with a core-to-core transfer agreement. With appropriate A.A. and A.S. degrees, students will be required to take only two core courses at DeSales: Intermediate Theology and Values Seminar.

    15) DeSales University has established articulation agreements with the following eleven community colleges. Each agreement lists courses that have been pre-approved for transfer and courses that will not be accepted for transfer. 

          Pennsylvania

    • Bucks County Community College
    • Community College of Philadelphia
    • Delaware County Community College
    • Lehigh Carbon Community College*
    • Montgomery County Community College*
    • Northampton Community College*
    • Reading Area Community College

          New Jersey

    • County College of Morris
    • Middlesex County College
    • Raritan Valley Community College
    • Warren County Community College*

          * A core-to-core agreement with DeSales University exists

    16) The transfer policy for graduate programs is available 

  • Whistleblower Policy

    The current whistleblower policy, effective 9/5/12.
    Whistleblower Policy
  • Withdrawing From a Course

    A student may drop any course during the first week of each semester. In the event of such a drop, the course is not listed on his or her permanent record. Subsequent withdrawal (withdrawal with permission) requires approval. Traditional day students must complete the appropriate section for course withdrawal on the Approval Form, secure a signature from their advisor and the director of the academic resource center, and present the form for approval to the Registrar. ACCESS students should consult with their ACCESS Academic Advisor.

    The last day for withdrawal with permission is the date published in the academic calendar. If a student withdraws with permission, he/she will be given a grade of either W, WP or WF, at the instructor’s discretion. The grade given in such instances will become part of the student’s permanent record but will not be used in the computation of his or her grade point average. Withdrawal more than two weeks after the day on which mid-term grades are due results in a failure (F) in all cases except those exempted by the Academic Affairs Committee as the result of student appeal.

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