Skip to main content

Department of Chemistry & Physics

Unrivaled access to outstanding lab facilities and a warm, close-knit community of students and faculty are hallmarks of chemistry at DeSales.

The majors in Chemistry and Biochemistry-Molecular Biology offer a uniquely DeSales experience. Our small class sizes, modern laboratories, and supportive community create an atmosphere for learning enriched by our Salesian values. Your teachers, advisors and research mentors know you and are dedicated to your success.

Our faculty represent a broad range of individual specialties and are well-respected for their research and professional activities. You will have the opportunity to take part in research, publish and present your work, and participate in a dynamic community of scientific inquiry.

You’ll have hands-on access to facilities unrivaled at many other liberal arts universities. Throughout their education, students gain extensive experience with instrumentation. Thanks to our generous endowments, grants, and benefactors, our instrument suite includes a recently purchased Fluorimeter, HPLC, and Bomb Calorimeter, and UV-VIS and IR spectrometers in addition to an AA, NMR, ICP-AES, GC, and GC-MS. Our freshman chemistry lab and physics labs are equipped with Pasco sensors and software that enable digital data collection and analysis.

Carl Tyce ’23 Awarded Research Grant from American Society for Cell Biology

by Janelle Hill Apr 7, 2021
2021-CarlTyce-news

When asked about his first scientific research project at DeSales, sophomore Carl Tyce ’23 likens the experience to riding a bike. After years of simply reading research, Tyce says the training wheels are finally coming off. 

The American Society for Cell Biology awarded Tyce, a biology major in the STEP program, a $2,000 grant. That money will allow him to spearhead a project to incorporate statistics into the molecular biology curriculum.

“Stats is really the way that you support your claims,” he says. “If you can’t support your claims, you can’t do science. Having a knowledge of statistics is important so students not only perform science themselves, but gather the information, organize it in a way that they deem fitting, run the test, and interpret and report the results.” 

Tyce plans to build off a laboratory project by Dr. Lara Goudsouzian, associate professor of biology, that centers on invasive species in our area. He plans to take data from that project and use it as an introduction to statistics within the curriculum. 

First, he’ll gather all the research and foundational information before developing the student materials this summer. Then in the fall, he’ll compile the assessment data and analyze the results. He hopes to eventually publish a paper about the experience. 

“I’m only a sophomore and I’m already doing independent research, which is crazy to think about. I’ve always seen science research, but now I finally get to experience it for myself. It’s really eye opening, and it’s a lot of fun.” 

 Carl Tyce ’23

Tyce, who previously received DeSales’ coveted Leadership Scholarship—a full-tuition scholarship—first learned of the grant opportunity from Goudsouzian. He credits Goudsouzian and the rest of the faculty with helping to make the project a reality. 

“If I went to a bigger school, I wouldn’t have this opportunity,” he says. “I wouldn’t get to know my professors in such a personal way. If I hadn’t gone to office hours and Dr. G hadn’t talked to me about what I want to do with my career, I would have never been able to get this grant.” 

Carl Tyce ’23 Awarded Research Grant from American Society for Cell Biology

by Janelle Hill Apr 7, 2021
2021-CarlTyce-news

When asked about his first scientific research project at DeSales, sophomore Carl Tyce ’23 likens the experience to riding a bike. After years of simply reading research, Tyce says the training wheels are finally coming off. 

The American Society for Cell Biology awarded Tyce, a biology major in the STEP program, a $2,000 grant. That money will allow him to spearhead a project to incorporate statistics into the molecular biology curriculum.

“Stats is really the way that you support your claims,” he says. “If you can’t support your claims, you can’t do science. Having a knowledge of statistics is important so students not only perform science themselves, but gather the information, organize it in a way that they deem fitting, run the test, and interpret and report the results.” 

Tyce plans to build off a laboratory project by Dr. Lara Goudsouzian, associate professor of biology, that centers on invasive species in our area. He plans to take data from that project and use it as an introduction to statistics within the curriculum. 

First, he’ll gather all the research and foundational information before developing the student materials this summer. Then in the fall, he’ll compile the assessment data and analyze the results. He hopes to eventually publish a paper about the experience. 

“I’m only a sophomore and I’m already doing independent research, which is crazy to think about. I’ve always seen science research, but now I finally get to experience it for myself. It’s really eye opening, and it’s a lot of fun.” 

 Carl Tyce ’23

Tyce, who previously received DeSales’ coveted Leadership Scholarship—a full-tuition scholarship—first learned of the grant opportunity from Goudsouzian. He credits Goudsouzian and the rest of the faculty with helping to make the project a reality. 

“If I went to a bigger school, I wouldn’t have this opportunity,” he says. “I wouldn’t get to know my professors in such a personal way. If I hadn’t gone to office hours and Dr. G hadn’t talked to me about what I want to do with my career, I would have never been able to get this grant.” 



#73
in Regional Universities North (tie)

U.S. News & World Report

#49
in Best Colleges for Veterans (tie)

U.S. News & World Report

#39
in Best Value Schools

U.S. News & World Report

#124
in Top Performers on Social Mobility (tie)

U.S. News & World Report